Parallel Visions by Cheryl Rainfield (ARC Review)

Release date: November 20 2012

Publisher: Rain and Sun Press

Number of pages: 146

My rating: 4/5

Parallel visions is a great read. It was very short, and only took me around half an hour to read. It adresses a lot of issues, such as abuse, rape, and depression.

Parallel visions is told from the perspective of Kate, who suffers from severe asthma. She gets visions of the futue and the past when she has a bad attack, and after she sees a friend's sister commiting suicide and her own sister being attacked by her own husband, she decides to take action.

In a lot of ways, this book reminded me of Brightest Kind of Darkness by P.T Michelle. Both main characters from each book could see the future, and they both intervened. However, this book was still very unique and fun to read.

Kate was an incredibly brave character. I suffer from asthma too, but thankfully mine isn't nearly as bad as hers. She tries to trigger attacks so she can see more of the future. With asthma severe as Kate's, triggering an attack can easily mean death or a trip to the hospital. She was incredibly kind and cared a lot about others.

Gil, the love interest and the brother of the girl committing suicide showed up a lot. He was very kind and caring, and supported Kate throughout the book. However, I don't think he was developed very well. Sometimes he felt very flat and boring.

Another problem I had with this book is that some parts of it felt rushed. The problems in the book seemed to be solved very quickly. Some of the solutions were glazed over.

I loved the way the issues in the book were dealt with. I gasped in horror when I read about Inez's story, and Kate's abuse was horrifying. These things happen every day around the world.

Parallel visions is a lovely read. I would definitely reccomend it to other readers.

A free copy was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Wave by Morton Rhue (Review)

Objects in Mirror by Tudor Robins (Review)

Prodigy by Marie Lu (Review)