Saving June by Hannah Harrington (Review)

Release date: 1 June 2012

Publisher: Mira Ink

Number of pages: 336

My rating: 4/5

Amazing. Absolutely amazing.

Saving June is about a girl called Harper. Her sister, June has just commited suicide, and her family is falling apart. When her parents decide to split her ashes, Harper steals the ashes and drives across the country with her best friend, Laney, and June's friend, Jake, to scatter her ashes in California, where June has always dreamed of going.

Saving June was amazing. It handled all the issues very well, and the characters were likable enough. It was a very emotional book, and it dealt with the suicide component very well. THe characters were probably the lowest point of the story.

Harper was pretty cool. She had her own problems, being the "bad kid" and the "disappointment to the family." She was a very realistic character, and she was very mature.

Laney was also pretty cool. She was the slutty character, but she wasn't depicted as a bad one. An annoying thing in YA today is the slut shaming. Descriptions of revealing clothes, depicting every promiscuous character as a dumb, good-for-nothing bitch. Luckily, Saving June doesn't suffer from tis flaw. Laney was very caring, and supported Harper through everything she did.

Jacob was probably the least likable character. Through most of the book, Harper and Jacob were clashing. Jacob was mysterious and annoying, but he took great care of Harper and Laney.

Most of the book is about the road trip to California. However, the road trip was incredibly interesting. Harper grows a lot throughout the book, and I feel that at the end, she really finds herself.
)[suicide note from June and the scattering of her ashes (hide sThe book was short, only coming up at over 300 pages, but was filled with heartbreak, romance, and self discovery. This book is a must read for everyone.

A free copy was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

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